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 Co-Teaching Modules 201 - Module 3


Supportive Instruction: The Role of the Paraprofessional

This module will provide the knowledge and skills needed to improve professional practice within the inclusive classroom. It includes essential content needed for paraprofessionals to be able to provide supportive instruction in a standards-based classroom, assist with classroom management, know the basics of special education law, understand the co-teaching models, implement instructional strategies, respect diversity, demonstrate the ability to provide differentiation, assist with data collection, and be an active participant in the team building process. The framework for instruction will establish the supportive instruction model as a co-teaching team.

Participant Goals:

Teachers will be able to:

  • Develop a base of knowledge about Special Education and co-teaching strategies that will impact the supportive instruction co-teaching team as measured by lesson plans, student work samples, and reflections on implementation
  • Build a repertoire of research-based instructional strategies that will support their students to increase achievement toward CCGPS as measured by formative assessments
  • Learn the benefits and responsibilities of teaching in today's diverse classrooms and how to insure that each student with disabilities achieves success as measured by their IEP goals

Topic 1: Instructional Partnerships

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Topic 2: Classroom Management

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Topic 3: Foundations of Special Education 

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Topic 4: Instructional Strategies in Reading & Math

Document, Presentation and Website Resources:

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Topic 5: Differentiating Instruction & Diversity

Document and Presentation Resources:

  • Culturally Responsive Teaching in Special Education for Ethnically Diverse Students: Setting the Stage. Gay, G. (2002). QUALITATIVE STUDIES IN EDUCATION, 15, 613-629.
    • Abstract
      Two major premises are developed in this discussion. One is that many students of color are disproportionately assigned to special education because educators lack knowledge about or appreciation for their cultural values and socialization, and how these affect learning behaviors. The other premise is that the educational quality of students of color in both special and regular education can be improved significantly by using instructional programs and practices that reflect their cultural heritages, experiences, and perspectives. Several components of this ''culturally responsive teaching'' are explained, along with some research findings about its effects on student achievement. These include critical cultural consciousness of teachers; culturally pluralistic classroom climates; diverse communities of learners; and multicultural curriculum and instruction. The author concludes that without culturally responsive teaching education can never be the best it should be for students who are not part of the majority and mainstream of schools and society.  Access to full article - Taylor & Francis Online

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